Rent by Luke Jameson

Happy Friday, book lovers!

Today, I’m thrilled to share this hot new release for you from my Twitter-buddy, Luke Jameson!

Read on for the cover and blurb — and then click on a buy link to get your copy!


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Rent’s due, and Joe’s bank balance hovers perilously close to zero.

Desperate for cash, Joe hustles until he finds not just one man to satisfy, but a room full of hungry, powerful men in our nation’s capital. These men make laws that govern us all, and hide their true desires from everyone – except Joe.

Determined to extract every dollar he can from the corrupt elite, he dances his way into their fantasies, putting on a show that leaves them begging for release.

Joe and a fellow dancer put on a sizzling performance no one in the voyeuristic audience will ever forget. One night on stage doing what we all do in private guarantees he’ll never have problems making rent again.

Buy your copy:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Kobo | iTunes

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Autumn Fire is back on the e-bookshelf!

My first novel, Autumn Fire, is getting a snazzy new re-release today over at Deep Desires Press! (For those new to the party, Deep Desires Press is my publishing company for erotica and erotic romance.)

Most authors have that first novel that they really wish hadn’t seen the light of day. Not me. I love my first novel.

When I sat down to revise it (and it needed an overhaul), I fell in love with the characters and the story all over again.

Come along for the ride — I know you’ll love it!

Click here to find out more.

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Gay Incest Erotica Bundle by Sky Boss

Sky Boss has a hot 4-pack bundle of gay incest erotica stories — and it’s on sale right now!

Head on over to Smashwords to pick up your copy — and use coupon code MM58M to get 55% off! (Deal is only good for the month of January 2018!)


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Four sexy stories spanning 17,000+ words of horny gay incest encounters between fathers, sons, boyfriends and grandfathers.

In Dad Seduces Scally Lad, horny father Tom convinces his son Andy to dump his clingy girlfriend and make love with a real man, his old man!

In Seduced by my Son’s Boy Friend, Craig doesn’t suspect his Dad is gay, in fact his Dad never lusted after Craig until he got sucked off by Craig’s best friend, Ethan! Now he’s started to develop these urges towards his own son that are freaking him out! When Ethan and Craig announce that they’re an item, Mr Evans finds himself tricked by Ethan into a horny dark liaison with his own son.

In Falling for my Sexy Son, Dad never found guys attractive until Kevin came home from university. Kevin isn’t any ordinary guy, he’s a guy that Dad made into a guy! He raised Kevin into the man he is and suddenly he feels pride (or is it lust?) deep in his loins whenever he looks at Kevin.

In Spit Roasted by Dad & Granddad, Joe returns home from backpacking in South East Asia thinking he’s all grown up! Dad & Granddad will have to teach him a couple of things about being a man.

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Our Biggest Sale EVER!

Smashwords is having a year-end sale and almost all of the Indie Erotica Collective books are on sale! You can get fantastic deals on smutty reads from Cameron D. James, Master Dominic, Ethan White, and Sandra Claire!

All of these deals are valid December 25th to January 1st — so don’t miss out!

Now, on to the deals!

25% OFF

 

50% OFF

 

75% OFF

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Goodreads is Anti-Indie-Author — Sex For Money, Post #22

Sex For Money is a semi-regular blog series about my experiences in writing, publishing, and marketing gay erotica and M/M erotic romance. All of this information is from my own experience, so your experience may differ. To read more Sex For Money posts, click here.


It was announced this week that Goodreads will now charge authors or publishers who want to run a giveaway on the Goodreads platform.

I’ve long been an advocate of Goodreads giveaways, as I’ve seen that they can boost book purchases for a reasonably small investment. How it would work is you’d set up a giveaway on the Goodreads site, let it run for a few weeks or a month, and then you send out the copy of your print book to the winner. In a successful giveaway, a number of people who entered to win would have also added your book to their “to read” list on Goodreads. This strategy rarely led to an immediate bump in sales, but rather led to a healthy level of ongoing sales, as those who marked your book as “to read” would eventually go out and buy it.

Giveaways on Goodreads were a good way to spread the word about your book for a relatively small cost — just the cost of the book and postage.

Now, though, Goodreads is charging for authors or publishers who want to run a giveaway on their website. For a mere *cough* $119 USD, you can have the priviledge of giving away copies of your book to people on Goodreads. If you’ve got money to burn, you can pay *cough* $599 USD to also have the priviledge of “exclusive placement” on the Goodreads giveaway page.

Who the fuck has that kind of money laying around? Other than the big five publishers, of course.

There are some beneficial changes coming when this new pricing scheme is implemented. Now, the person who enters to win won’t be given the option of adding the book to their “to read” list — Goodreads will automatically go ahead and do it for them. (As a reader, I know that if I enter to win a book, it doesn’t imply I’m captivated enough to go out and buy it, so I’m not a fan of this automatic feature.) As well, if someone has your book on their “to read” list already, they will be notified if there is a giveaway for your book. That’s good, I guess, but the purpose of running a giveaway is to get more people to add it to their “to read” list, not necessarily to give it away to people who have already bought or are about to buy your book.

So, what’s going on here?

According to Goodreads, the new features (which are mediocre at best) are being implemented in the new giveaway system in response to requests from authors and publishers. They’re not clear exactly what authors and publishers have been requesting, but I highly doubt they were asking to pay through the nose for a feature that used to be free.

What I suspect is that the “Big 5” publishers are angry (yet again) that their books are being swamped by the glut of indie published books. Book selling can be a low-profit business, so these Big 5 publishers need every advantage they can get over the small publishers and indie authors — and what better advantage than to squeeze them out of the Goodreads giveaway system? Somehow, the Big 5 successfully made this pitch to Goodreads.

Really, though, it doesn’t take a genius to figure out that Goodreads is also looking for a way to capitalize on their platform. Goodreads makes money on advertisers on their site and they may even make money on referral links if you click the “buy” buttons on book pages. In the modern world of internet businesses, they’re not squeezing every dime out of their users like they’re “supposed” to. So, why not take one of their biggest and most popular features — the giveaways — and charge a fuckton of money for it?

I also suspect that they dislike the glut of erotica in their giveaways and are hoping to squeeze some of us out. I know that I’ll never post a giveaway again as long as they’re charging for it — and neither will my publishing company. If anything, this has the stench of an attack against erotica (read more about the booksellers’ war against erotica in my earlier post).

So — prohibitive cost aside — let’s look at what this wonderful new giveaway system on Goodreads brings to authors, publishers, and readers.

The help section reveals a couple more nasty details about the new giveaway system:

  • Giveaways can only be made available for US residents. For publishers and authors outside of North America, postage to send to the US can be prohibitive. In the past, I’m sure most of these individuals or companies made their giveaways available to their own country and nearby countries — so this clause only raises the price for foreign publishers and authors. As a Canadian, I object to not being able to make giveaways available in my own country. Also, now all non-US Goodreads users are banned from entering giveaways until this policy changes.
  • You can do giveaways for ebooks (yay!), but they must be ebooks that are available on Amazon. This is telling. While Amazon has owned Goodreads for a few years, they had promised to let it run independently as it always had. Apparently, that’s not good enough anymore and Amazon is bringing Goodreads under the Amazon umbrella. (In fact, you pay for your Goodreads giveaway with your Amazon account.) You can certainly expect more changes further down the line that make this beneficial to Amazon-exclusive authors and difficult/costly for widely-published authors.

Goodreads’s/Amazon’s claim for the price is that it reflects the marketing value that is provided by running a giveaway. In my opinion as an author, that is pure and simple bullshit.

While I have long advocated Goodreads giveaways as an effective marketing tool, that ends as of yesterday. There is no value in listing a giveaway on Goodreads.

The effectiveness of giveaways on Goodreads have dwindled over the years. I still remember my first one that I listed four or five years ago — I had hundreds of people enter to win and hundreds of people add my book to their “to read” list. For my last few giveaways, I had hundreds of people enter to win, but only dozens add it to their “to read” list. Readers on Goodreads are in it for the free books — which is totally fine, I’m not lambasting that — but if your aim is to sell books, the effectiveness of a giveaway on Goodreads has dwindled.

As well, as part of a giveaway, winners are requested by Goodreads to post a review. In my experience, this happens less and less frequently. Years ago, if I sent out three books, I got three reviews from winners. Nowadays, if I send out three books, I might get one review from a winner. (Part of Goodreads’s new system is that they will remind winners to post a review — I doubt that’ll change the follow-through rate.)

I also suspect that Goodreads/Amazon is slowly pushing authors who want to do giveaways over to Amazon itself. I have not investigated giveaways on Amazon (so some of my assumptions here may be wrong), though I know giveaways on Amazon are a thing now, it’s something you can do. If the prices are cheaper than on Goodreads, or if they’re even free, then that is part of the grand design — they’re planning to integrate Goodreads and Amazon into (eventually) one thing, and they’re starting by shunting all the indies over. I wouldn’t put this past Amazon — the writing is on the wall for Createspace with the introduction of KDP Print. I’m holding off on transitioning to KDP Print until they offer the same level of service that Createspace does or until they force me over. The writing has been on the wall for Goodreads for quite some time now.

So, back to giveaways. what’s next? What is an author or publisher to do?

You could run giveaways using Rafflecopter, but unless you’ve got a wide network already, you’ll end up with few entrants. The benefit of the old Goodreads system (before it began to lose effectiveness) was that new readers could discover you, which won’t happen with a Rafflecopter giveaway marketed to people who already are fans of your work.

You could use Instafreebie to give away a free book to whoever clicks a link. This could be effective for series starters (provided you have the sequels out already), but from what I’ve seen, I think the Instafreebie thing came and went already — they were a craze for a while and now fewer authors and readers are using it.

What we need is an indie-friendly giveaway site. Not like Instafreebie where you give away hundreds or thousands of free copies of ebooks, but a site like the old Goodreads giveaway system. And to make it extra-effective for marketing, after someone enters a giveaway, the system should have a pop-up asking the entrant to sign up for the author’s newsletter. That would be effective promotion — the #1 avenue for marketing is your author newsletter, and if the giveaway system would integrate with MailChimp and auto-add people (with consent) to your mailing list, then that would be awesome.

(If you’re a computer programmer and like that idea, I claim no copyright on it — steal my idea and make it happen!)

For now, though, goodbye, Goodreads. I wish I could say it was nice knowing you.

Edited to add: Also, the fact that the post on Goodreads announcing this change has been closed to comments shows that Goodreads knows they’re doing the wrong thing — but they don’t want to hear about it.

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Changes at MailChimp — Sex For Money, Post #21

Sex For Money is a semi-regular blog series about my experiences in writing, publishing, and marketing gay erotica and M/M erotic romance. All of this information is from my own experience, so your experience may differ. It’s hoped that sharing this information might be helpful to new and aspiring erotica and erotic romance authors, as I see a lot of questions and a lot of misinformation out there. To read more Sex For Money posts, click here.


MailChimp announced recently that the new default for sign-up forms for MailChimp newsletters will switch from double opt-in to single opt-in, unless you live in the EU.

There’s a lot of information in that sentence, so let’s unpack it a bit before we get to the problem.

If you have a MailChimp newsletter, you have a sign-up form somewhere, some way for people to subscribe to your mailing list. With a single opt-in form, a subscriber just needs to enter their email address in your form, click subscribe, and they’re on your mailing list. With double opt-in, after a subscriber does those steps, they receive an email in their inbox asking them to confirm that they want to subscribe to your newsletter. (If they don’t click the link in the email, they will not subscribe to your list.)

The default used to be double opt-in. MailChimp has now made the default single opt-in (unless you’re in the EU).

Sounds great, right? It’ll be easier for people to subscribe to your mailing list and your list might grow faster!

That’s where we encounter some HUGE problems.

First of all, this isn’t necessarily a from-the-kindness-of-their-hearts move from MailChimp. They want you to have more people on your list because when you hit a certain number, you have to pay to use MailChimp — and I think those fees go up the larger your list is.

Well, they’re a business, so of course they’re looking for ways to increase revenues.

The real problem is with anti-spam legislation.

The reason single opt-in isn’t the default for EU based newsletters is because single opt-in is illegal in some places, such as Germany. And if anyone on your subscriber list is in Canada, you can be in BIG trouble.

In Canada, we have very tough anti-spam legislation that applies to anyone that sends or receives spam in Canada. You could be based in Australia or Peru, but if you have a Canadian on your mailing list, the legislation applies to you. In Canada, to comply with anti-spam legislation, you must have double opt-in, among other things.

Canada’s anti-spam legislation sounds intimidating, but there are a few basic criteria to keep you in compliance. You cannot add subscribers without their consent. (There are some loopholes in this, but this is a general guideline.) You must have an unsubscribe link in your newsletter. And you must have your physical mailing address in the email. If you use MailChimp, all of these are basics in how MailChimp operates and it’ll keep you in compliance.

So what’s the big deal with single opt-in? Someone could add other users without their consent — and since there isn’t the back-up of double opt-in (where the owner of the email account must actually verify they want to be a subscriber), you could have people on your list that never signed up for it. If they complain to the Canadian government, you could run into some difficulties.

Are you going to get fined by the Canadian government if someone adds a subscriber to your list without their consent? Not likely. But you can save yourself a lot of headaches and hassle by changing the default on your MailChimp back to double opt-in.

If you think about it, who do you want on your email newsletter subscriber list? Absolutely everyone that entered their email address — including people who did it on a whim or maybe even didn’t know what they were signing up for? Or just those who are truly interested in the books you write and want to be notified of what you’re up to? Sure, those higher subscriber numbers might be exciting, but if most of your subscribers aren’t really your target audience, you’re just wasting your effort. A smaller subscriber list, but one full of real fans, is exactly what you want. Double opt-in helps that process along.

To change it back to double opt-in:

  • After you log in to MailChimp, click on “Lists” at the top
  • Then click on your subscriber list (and if you have multiple lists, you’ll have to do this for each list)
  • Then click on “Settings”
  • On the drop-down menu, click on “List name and defaults”
  • Right under “Form Settings” you’ll find a toggle for double opt-in — click it so it turns on
  • Scroll to the bottom and click “Save”

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Interview with Nathan Bay, author of Young Forever

Greetings, book lovers! Today I’m thrilled to have Nathan Bay as my guest! Nathan is the author of Young Forever, which is out today, and I’ve got him here for a quick interview!


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Tell us about your latest release.

Young Forever is a gay erotic thriller. It tells the story of Roger Willis, a man who’s newly divorced and just turned forty. Roger is trying to navigate the complicated world of dating in a technology-driven era, where meeting men is so much different than it was two decades ago when he was last single.

That’s when a handsome young man named Ben Hudson comes along and gives Roger new hope for the future. There’s relationship potential, but Roger has secrets. What will happen when Ben opens the door to Roger’s past and the skeletons come tumbling out?

Meanwhile, gay men are mysteriously disappearing. Rumors suggest they’re being murdered, but there’s no evidence to prove it. The gay community is on edge, wondering if a serial killer is lurking in the shadows. Who’s responsible for the crimes and how can they be stopped?

Lies will be told. Hearts will be broken. Fluids will be spilled. It’s going to be a bloodbath.

Sounds exciting!

young-forever-nathan-bayWhat was the hardest or most difficult scene to write?

A pivotal death takes place in a morgue. I’d written it in a way that was action packed and dramatic. After I finished the first draft of it, I did some fact-checking with a group of morticians and found out the scene wouldn’t work from a technical perspective. I was feeling disappointed that I couldn’t use the scene, but then the morticians chipped in and started brainstorming. They came up with a unique and grisly way to die, and I don’t think it’s ever been presented this way before.

This time, I wanted to make sure I really understood the setting and details. I did research on YouTube watching instructional embalming videos with bodies being cut open and drained. I wanted to make sure I got everything right. The rewrite of the scene is truly horrific, and I’m proud of how it turned out. The subject matter is intense, and it took me to some dark places on the Internet to find answers, but I think it will pay off and be just as shocking for the reader.

*shudder* I don’t think I could do that kind of research… 🙂

What was your favorite scene to write?

Chapter 6: Teenage Dream. It’s the first sex scene between Roger and Ben, and I love everything about it. Although it comes fairly early in the book, it was one of the last scenes I wrote. I put it off for a long time because I felt the pressure of how special this scene needed to be. Not only was it the first sex scene between the lead characters, but it was also the most graphic sex scene I’d ever written—and I knew it was going to be. Procrastination paid off, because once I finally wrote it, I’d already written most of the other material, and I felt like I understood the dynamics of their personalities.

I wanted to capture that magic of new romance, and that testosterone-driven, lose-your-mind type of intensity when two guys want each other so badly that it feels like they can’t get deep enough. It’s not just penetration; it’s truly trying to connect with the other person’s body in a way so satisfying that their spirits merge.

I think (hope) that I’ve accomplished that. It was one of those scenes I stayed up all night writing because it just hit me all at once. When I finally dragged myself to bed in the morning, I felt like I’d gone on a journey. It’s rewarding to witness something palpable between two lovers using only words and imagination.

I know what that’s like — sometimes a scene just takes full control of your body and mind and you can’t do anything but give into it until it’s finished!

Why did you decide to self-publish?

Thanks to Amazon, I’ve discovered a diverse world of self-published authors who are bursting with creativity. They’re able to take more risks with their work and often delve into storylines that traditional publishers would not touch. As a reader, I love it, and as a writer, I wanted to be part of it.

That’s why I think self-publishing is the best fit for me. I like to explore abstract ideas without restrictions. I also like creative control over everything. I’m responsible for my book, the cover design, the marketing, and anything else attached to my name.

Amazon is helping validate this growing new market of writers and giving us a platform. This is an exciting time.

Do you like music while you write? Or do you prefer total silence?

Music is a contributing source of inspiration to my writing process. The Katy Perry song, “Teenage Dream,” is what the book is named after. These are the lyrics:

Let’s go all the way tonight
No regrets, just love
We can dance until we die
You and I
We’ll be young forever

My husband was so mad at me when I revealed the title because “Teenage Dream” was a special song for us. (Sorry, honey.) Now he only thinks of death when he hears it, and there are multiple lyrics within the song that can be given a cryptic slant if you think about it in a different light.

Another major contributor was the music video for Lady Gaga’s song, “Paparazzi.” I first got the idea several years ago when I was watching it and thought about all the beautiful young corpses on display in the mansion. I wondered what the story was, and what if it were a book? That’s where I got the idea for Young Forever. Thanks, Gaga.

I’ve put together a playlist of music that relates to the scenes in the book. The songs are arranged in chronological order, so if you want some ambiance while you’re reading, check it out at nathanbayauthor.com/youngforever.

Very cool! I love when the inspiration for a novel is so unique like this!

Well, folks, I hope you enjoyed this meet and greet with Nathan! Now, go over to Amazon and buy the book — it’s out today!


nathan-bayAbout the Author

Nathan Bay writes gay-themed fiction about ordinary people faced with extraordinary circumstances. His characters fight for love while fighting to save their lives, pitted against the dark forces of evil who threaten to take it all away. His other books include King of the Sea and The Invisible Plan.

Nathan currently resides in sunny California with his husband, son, a schnauzer named Mrs. Madrigal, and Iris, a cat with twenty-two toes.

Learn more about Nathan Bay at nathanbayauthor.com. Connect on Twitter @nathanbayauthor.

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